Monday, October 06, 2008

Supraspinatus Calcific Tendonitis-CT


"Painter described calcification in the shoulder in 1907. Codman established that the calcification was within the tendons of the rotator cuff. Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder is characterized by the presence of macroscopic deposits of hydroxyapatite (a crystalline calcium phosphate) in any tendon of the rotator cuffEven supraspinatus tendons that are macroscopically normal contain minute amounts of calcium deposits. Degenerative tendons that have ruptured contain more calcium deposits, but it is not always in the form of calcium phosphate. The increase in calcium deposits is due to degenerative calcification.In contrast, the calcium in tendons with radiographically visible calcification is in the form of crystalline hydroxyapatite. Calcifying tendinitis is a different condition from that of degenerative tendons in which there is a small increase in calcium content. genral asymptomatic population in 30 to 50 yrs display calccificatin in about 3 to 20%The supraspinatus tendon is affected most often. Calcification is observed with decreasing frequency in the infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis tendons. More than one tendon may be involved. Women are affected slightly more frequently than are men (housewives and clerical workers account for most cases), and the right shoulder is affected slightly more often than the left is. Both shoulders can have or develop calcific deposits in 13-47% of subjects, and the calcific deposit usually is described as being approximately 1-2 cm proximal to the tendon insertion on the greater tuberosity. Computed tomography (CT) scanning may be used to accurately localize the calcific deposit."

Case by Dr MGK Murthy, Sr Consultant Radiologist
&
Dr.Sumer K Sethi, MD
Sr Consultant Radiologist ,VIMHANS and CEO-Teleradiology Providers

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